Thursday, October 24, 2019

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9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Plenary
Focus on Maternal and Childhood Vaccination

C. Mary Healy, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases Section
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital

and Stephen Pont, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Office of Science and Population Health
Texas Department of State Health Services
Maternal immunization benefits both mother and infant (2 for 1 protection).  Immunized mothers transport protective antibodies to infants that prevent infection in early life. Maternal immunization against influenza and pertussis during every pregnancy is recommended.  The benefit of immunizing pregnant women against influenza is established due to high disease burden in infected pregnant women.  Ongoing pertussis outbreaks demonstrate that the greatest pertussis-associated morbidity and mortality is in infants <3 months of age and pertussis booster vaccine (Tdap) may passively protect young infants in the first few months of life. This approach was 91% effective in preventing pertussis in infants aged < 3 months in the United Kingdom. Vaccines targeting pregnant women must overcome historical and contemporary barriers to optimally benefit both mothers and young infants.  Building a strong maternal immunization platform is critical both for preventing illness now and holds hope for the future as new vaccines are developed.

Objective:

  • Describe the rationale for maternal immunization and outline current US maternal immunization recommendations.

 

10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Epidemiology and Surveillance
“Outbreak:" The Hepatitis-A and Mumps Edition
Emilie Prot, Do, MPH, Regional Medical Director, Region 11
Texas Department of State Health Services and
Montique Shepherd, II, MPA, CDC Public Health Advisor
Texas Department of State Health Services
This breakout session will discuss the personal experiences of public health professionals who have served as first-line responders and directly supported the 2019 West Virginia Hepatitis-A Outbreak Response and a case study of a 2019 Mumps OutbreakRresponse occurring inone  Texas Detention Center. Be prepared to hear about the many different challenges that surrounded these response efforts, and learn best practices that were used and proven to be successful in addressing these national emergencies.

Objectives:

  • Describe public health professional exposures in the national trends in the statewide hepatitis A outbreak in West Virginia and the Mumps Outbreak in Texas Detention Centers.
  • Identify specific populations to mumps transmission and provide appropriate measure to mitigate outbreak.
  • Identify partner's needs to support their efforts during a mumps outbreak.

 

TVFC
Storage and Handling: Case Studies and Lessons Learned
Trish Stowe, MHA, Texas Vaccines for Children Consultant Team Lead
Texas Department of State Health Services and
Jennifer Hamilton, Texas Vaccines for Children Consultant
Texas Department of State Health Services
Correct vaccine storage and handling practices are the first step in keeping communities safe from vaccine-preventable diseases. Using a case-study format, this session will provide health professionals with tools to understand their role in proper storage and handling practices. The speakers will provide detailed guidance on best practices for both refrigerated and frozen vaccines.

Objective:

  • Describe proper storage and handle practices for refrigerated and frozen vaccines.

 

Screenings
Hilleman
Directed by Donald Rayne Mitchell and co-produced by Gloria Lewis, HILLEMAN – A Perilous Quest to Save the World’s Children tells the inspiring story of Dr. Maurice R. Hilleman, a man with a singular, unwavering focus — to eliminate the diseases of children. From his poverty-stricken youth on the plains of Montana, he came to prevent pandemic flu, develop the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, and invent the first-ever vaccine against human cancer. Through exclusive interviews with Dr. Hilleman and his peers, rare archival footage, and 3-D animations, the film puts a human face to vaccine science, revealing the character that drove this bold, complex, and heroic man.

No CEs for this session.

 

Adult Vaccines
Your Ally In Protection: How Pharmacies Can Improve Adult Access to Immunization
Debra Garza, RPh, CEO
Texas Pharmacy Association
and Denise Starkey, MPH, MA, Adolescent and Adult Immunization Coordinator, Immunization Unit
Texas Department of State Health Services
Throughout the state of Texas, adult vaccination rates continue to be a priority for healthcare providers. Committed to removing barriers to vaccines and improving vaccination coverage rates for adults, pharmacies play a vital role in increasing accessibility to vaccination services. Through the continued development and strengthening of partnerships between the Texas Pharmacy Association (TPA), DSHS, and pharmacy partners, the focus on increasing the awareness and importance of adult immunizations among the general public and healthcare providers remains a priority. During this session, participants will be presented with information of the past and current efforts to increase adult vaccination rates in the pharmacy setting, strategies focused on increasing the number of pharmacists offering and administering ACIP-recommended adult vaccinations, increasing the utilization the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) Standards for Adult Immunization Practice, and increasing the utilization of the Texas Immunization Registry, ImmTrac2.

Objectives:

  • Identify the importance of the knowledge and awareness for adult immunizations in Texas.
  • Demonstrate the important role pharmacies play in increasing the adult immunization rates in Texas.
  • Utilize the Texas Immunization Registry, ImmTrac2, to gain consent and record adult immunizations.

 

Child and Adolscent Vaccines
Tackling the Tough Topics: Outreach to Parents
Lori Anderson, MD, Consultant, Amistad Community Health Center
and Margie Esther Padilla, Pharm.D, CDE, BCACP, Clinical Associate Professor
University of Texas at El Paso
In today's age, some parents have an inherent suspicion of anything synthetic or artificial. Others are convinced that immunizations can cause harm to their child. How do healthcare professionals overcome objections and discuss the importance of vaccines to parents who are hesitant to vaccinate their children.

Objective:

  • Recite three facts about immunization that will help overcome objections by vaccine-hesitant patients.

 

11:45 AM - 1:45 PM

Plenary
Social Media, Communication and Advocacy: Learn at Lunch
Julie Boom, MD, Director, Immunization Project
Texas Children's Hospital
Kristen Holland Shear, Director, Digital and Social Media
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Doubts about vaccines, fueled by inaccurate information, could be fracturing the benefits of herd immunity brought on by vaccine acceptance, experts say. Platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube have been used to spread misinformation about the perceived dangers of getting immunized and have started taking action to stem it.  As social media usage increases, organizations need to have a social media presence, post correct, evidence-based information, and respond to people who ask questions. Attend this session to hear more about social media and other innovative communication methods to spread the word. 

Objective:

  • Describe how a provider can use social media platform to promote vaccination.

 

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Epidemiology and Surveillance
Immunization Information Systems: Creating a Nationwide Network of Information
Mary Beth Kurilo, MPH, MSW, Policy and Planning Director
American Immunization Registry Association
and Kevin Allen, ImmTrac Manager
Texas Department of State Health Services
This session will provide a national perspective on Immunization Registries from the American Immunization Registry Association and a State perspective of ImmTrac2, Texas'  Department of State Health Services immunization registry.  Attendees will have the opportunity to address questions and meet with Subject Matter Experts to discuss trends and benefits to providers, along with updates to Data Exchange capabilities.

Objective:

  • Describe the vision and impact of nationwide availability of Immunization data.

 

TVFC
Why Can't You Place Your Order This Month?
Kayla Boykins, Vaccine Accountability Team Lead
Texas Department of State Health Services and
Daniel Castillo, VMG Finance Team Lead
Texas Department of State Health Services
Have you ever attempted to place a vaccine order in EVI and it won’t go through? Join us as we discuss why and when vaccine orders cannot be fulfilled. Learn about maximum stock levels set for each enrolled facility and how decisions made about vaccine choice affects your ordering ability. Participants will learn how current on-hand vaccine inventory affects the ability to place additional orders, gain knowledge and understanding of the reporting process of vaccine usage,  learn the importance of timeliness reporting,  and discuss best practices for successful vaccine  order placing.

Objectives:

  • Describe the process used to calculate Maximum Stock Levels (MSL).
  • Identify methods to prevent loss.

 

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Screenings
Storytelling: A Valuable Tool in Immunization Communication
Rachel Cunningham, MPH, Immunization Registry and Educational Supervisor
Texas Children's Hospital
Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story was written by Texas Children's Hospital vaccine experts as a resource for the public to provide information and awareness about the increasingly complex issue of vaccination. In an age where rumors of frightening effects of vaccines abound and vaccination rates continue to decline, even more frightening are the stories of innocent children and young people who have suffered needlessly from a disease that could have easily been prevented with a vaccine. The stories in Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story are the profiles of real lives interrupted and damaged by vaccine-preventable disease. Each story shows the cost of human suffering from not vaccinating and has been shared to help parents grasp the impact of a choice not to vaccinate their child. While the stories portrayed carry caution, they also carry hope and the single profound message that vaccines save lives. Attend this session to learn how story telling can help be a persuasive educational tool regarding vaccine decision making.

Objective:

  • Recognize the importance of storytelling as a persuasive educational tool, regarding vaccine decision making.

 

Adult Vaccines
Complications of Influenza in Adults
Joan Mann, Executive Director
Kendra's Legacy Foundation and
Jennifer Shuford, MD, MPH, Infectious Disease Medical Officer, Division for Laboratory & Infectious Disease Services
Texas Department of State Health Services
The CDC estimates that there were about 40 million influenza (flu) illnesses in the US during the 2018-2019 flu season, resulting in about 600,000 hospitalizations and 35,000-60,000 deaths. Although certain populations are at higher risk of complications from flu, even healthy people who get flu are at risk for severe complications and death. In this lecture, we will review the clinical manifestations of seasonal flu, complications that can result from flu, and populations that are at most risk for flu complications. The session will include a personal story of Kendra Mann O'Brien who lost her life battling the flu and its complications. In addition, it will cover how organizations like Families Fighting Flu and Kendra's Legacy Foundation are trying to educate the public regarding the prevention of influenza and need for vaccinations.

Objective:

  • Identify complications of influenza infection in adults, including pneumonia (viral, bacterial), cardiac complications, and central nervous system involvement.

 

Child and Adolescent Vaccines
Immunizations and Schools
Lisa Formby, RN, TSNO President
Hereford ISD and
Julie Ketelsen, School Compliance Coordinator
Texas Department of State Health Services
School vaccination requirements are essential to safeguard children and adolescents by making sure they are protected when they get to school. During this session, experts will review Texas school immunization coverage and compliance rates, and learn about issues schools face in implementing immunization requirements. Participants will gain knowledge of the tools and resources available to schools to help increase immunization rates and overcome immunization barriers.  An overview of what immunizations are required for each grade, how to make sure that the record is valid and how to maintain compliance through the school year.  The important role the school nurse plays in notifying parents of vaccines that are recommended but not required and when the next dose of these is due.

Objectives:

  • Determine if students’ immunizations are current.
  • Determine if the immunization record is a valid record.

 

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Plenary
Communicating Vaccine Myths and Realities
Kathleen Gore, MPH, Coalition and Education Program Manager
The Immunization Partnership
Julie Boom, MD, Director, Immunization Project
Texas Children's Hospital
C. Mary Healy, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases Section
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital
The Communicating Vaccine Myths and Realities panel will feature 3-5 case scenarios exploring difference vaccine-related myths and strategies to address each myth.  The content will cover the CDC immunization schedule, the difference between required versus recommended vaccines, the world wide disease burden of vaccine-preventable diseases, common vaccine related myths and the science to address each, and methods providers can use to improve immunization rates in their practices.

Objectives:

  • Relate common vaccine concerns among pregnant mothers and mothers with newborns.
  • Describe the vaccine specific concerns apply to school-aged children and adolescents.
  • Describe communication techniques to use with parents when they choose not to vaccinate or to delay vaccines with their children